Tree Identification, Natives on Australia's East Coast, VIC, NSW, QLD

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Australian Tree Identification using Fruit Characteristics

Native tree and shrub pictures showing; fruit samples, full size specimens, leaf, bark and flower. Fruits of Australian flowering trees are classified either as succulent berries and drupes or dry pods, capsules and follicles. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions aiding in the identification are given for every tree species. The image folder below is constantly extended and updated, find something new each time you visit our web site. Species in the following genera are listed in groups on our web pages: Australian Fig trees (Ficus spp.), Australian Eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.), Grevilleas (Grevillea spp.) and Syzygium species (Lilly Pillies). Otherwise all native Australian tree species are listed in alphabetical order.

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Candlenut Aleurites moluccana

Candlenut Aleurites moluccana Other names: Candleberry, Indian Walnut, Kemiri, Kukui Nut Tree, Buah keras
Due to its wide distribution range throughout Asia and Oceania this medium tree species is known by numerous different common names. In its natural habitat of tropical rainforests it can reach a height of up to 25m with a large spreading canopy (Picture 1). Bark is firm, grey brown in colour and densely covered in brown coloured blisters (lenticels) giving it a a rough texture (2). Flowers measure up to 15 mm in diameter and feature 5 pure white and rounded petals. They are held on large panicles and flower over the winter months (in Australia) (3). The brown nut is covered in a hard shell reaching about 5 cm across and can be eaten after roasting (toxic when raw). It contains flammable oil enabling the nut to burn for up to 20 minutes, hence the Australian name of Candlenut. The nut has also been used for a range of medicinal purposes (4 & 5). Large simple leaves with an opposite or sometimes alternate arrangement are; up to 25 cm long, ovate in shape or 3 to 5 lobed, light green on top, paler beneath, slightly hairy below (along veins), rather thick and leathery in texture. Leaf apex (lobe apex) is acute, base shape is cordate. The stiff petiole is covered in fine hair and can be more than 25 cm long. Venation is very prominent with a palmate arrangement on lobed leaves (5). Distribution: Tropical Qld.

Candlenut Aleurites moluccana
(1)
Candlenut Aleurites moluccana Bark
(2)
Flower Aleurites moluccana
(3)
Candlenut Aleurites moluccana Fruit
(4)
Candlenut Aleurites moluccana Leaf
(5)
Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis

Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis
This species is a close relative to the Candlenut Aleurites moluccana (listed above) and was formerly classified as a subspecies of the above. Aleurites rockinghamensis is commonly found in upland and lowland tropical rainforests, and often a pioneer species in regrowth areas (1). In a forest environment it develops a straight trunk covered in a pale grey/brown bark showing longitudinal fissures (2). The mostly 3-lobed fruit can reach more than 8 cm across and changes from green to brown at full maturity. It contains 3 rounded seeds which are enclosed in a brown hard shell. The fruit of Aleurites moluccana only contains a single (sometimes 2) seed(s) (3 & 4). Large simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 40 cm long, broadly ovate with entire margins (on mature trees), dark green on top, paler beneath, sparsely hairy, strong and firm in texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a fine tip, base shape is cordate. Venation is semi-palmate and raised on both surfaces. The 2 prominent oblong shaped glands (inset) at the apex of the leaf stalk are a good identification feature. They are green on younger and change to black on older leaves. The strong and rigid petiole reaches up to 20 cm long (5). Distribution: Tropical N.QLD.

Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis
(1)
Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis Bark
(2)
Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis Fruit
(3)
Fruit Aleurites rockinghamensis
(4)
Candlenut Siris Aleurites rockinghamensis Leaf
(5)
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How to recognise Australian tree families and genera.
A practical field guide to the identification of native species. More than 200 full colour photographs and detailed descriptions explaining leaf, bark, flower, fruit and other tree characteristics.
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Pages: 128 pp.
Size: 13 cm wide x 18 cm high

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Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha

Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha
This small tropical rainforest tree species can reach a height of up to 6m and features distinctive large compound leaves (Image 1). Bark is coloured different tones of grey with a hard and fairly smooth texture (2). Fruit is a yellowish to orange coloured capsule with 3 or 4 lobes, each containing a seed covered in a fleshy orange aril (3). Large pinnate compound leaves consist of up to 16 leaflets, which are; up to 30 cm long, oblong to broad elliptical in shape with entire margins. Lower leaflet surface is a paler yellowish green colour with a reddish brown centre vein (4 & 5). Distribution: North Qld.

Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha
(1)
Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha Bark
(2)
Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha Fruit
(3)
Diploglottis macrantha
(4)
Cape Tamarind Diploglottis macrantha Leaves
(5)
Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora

Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora Other names: Claudie Tulipwood
The natural habitat of this attractive tall shrub is lowland tropical rainforest, where as an understorey species it prefers locations close to watercourses (Image 1). Bark is grey in colour, firm and finely rough due to a dense cover of lenticels (blisters) (2). The ornamental fruit is a capsule opening into 2 separate valves each containing a black seed covered in a yellow aril. The capsule is a vivid red colour and measures close to 2 cm in length. The base of the flower (calyx) remains with the fruit to full maturity (3). The dense and drooping foliage is made up of large pinnate compound leaves featuring up to 11 leaflets showing an alternate arrangement (4). Leaflets are; up to 40 cm long, oblong to oblanceolate (reverse lance shaped) with undulating (wavy) margins, hairless, rather glossy and smooth on both surfaces. Midrib, lateral and net veins are clearly visible on lower leaflet surface (5). Distribution: Cape York Peninsula, North Qld.

Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora
(1)
Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora Bark
(2)
Harpullia ramiflora Fruit
(3)
Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora Foliage
(4)
Cape York Tulipwood Harpullia ramiflora Leaflets
(5)
Cassia Senna acclinis

Cassia Senna acclinis Other names: Brush Senna, Rainforest Senna
This native shrub is rare due to clearing and the invasion of other exotic and noxious Senna species. It is (mostly) a single stemmed shrub less than 5m high, which is found in a range of different forest types (Picture 1). The slender trunk features a dark brown coloured bark with fine fissures and a slightly rough texture ( 2). Bright yellow flowers are up to 20 mm across and bloom over a long period throughout the year. They feature 5 stalked and obovate (reverse egg-shaped) petals characteristic for the genus (3). The fruit, a pod up to 18 cm long, is flattened and mostly straight in shape. It contains up to 30 shiny brown seeds about 5mm long (4). Pinnate compound leaves consist of up to 14 leaflets, which are; up to 5 cm long, mostly elliptic in shape with entire margins, oppositely arranged, mid-green in colour on top, light green below, mostly hairless, thin and soft in texture. Leaflet apex is bluntly acute to rounded, base shape is rounded. A stalked gland (inset) is visible at the junction of the lowest pair of leaflets with the grooved rachis (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to central Qld. Note: In identification the most obvious difference is the flattened seed pod of this native species compared to the rounded pod of the introduced Winter Senna or Easter Cassia (Senna pendula See Introduced Species) and the Smooth Cassia (Senna septemtrionalis). View Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of botanical terms used.

Cassia Senna acclinis Brush Senna
(1)
Cassia Senna acclinis Brush Senna Bark
(2)
Flower Senna acclinis
(3)
Cassia Senna acclinis Fruit Pods
(4)
Senna acclinis Brush Senna Leaves
(5)
Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda

Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda Other names: Grey Milkwood, Babai, Rubber Tree
The Cassowary Plum is able to attain a height of 30m in its natural habitat of tropical rainforests at lower altitudes. The foliage consisting of narrow long leaves held towards the end of young branches gives the canopy its characteristic appearance, which can be helpful in identification of this species (Picture 1). Bark at base of tree is a reddish brown in colour showing longitudinal ridges (2). The vivid blue coloured fruit is egg shaped and up to 12 cm long. It is a food source for the Southern Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius), giving the species its common name, but is reported to be toxic to humans (3). Simple leaves arranged in a spiral like fashion are; up to 30 cm long, oblanceolate with entire undulating margins, hairless, highly glossy on both surfaces with a smooth and polished like texture. Leaf apex is short acuminate, base shape gradually tapers (attenuate). The petiole is up to 5 cm long and emits white latex when broken (5). Distribution: Tropical northern Qld.

Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda
(1)
Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda Bark
(2)
Fruit Cerbera floribunda
(3)
Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda
(4)
Cassowary Plum Cerbera floribunda Leaves
(5)
Celery Wood Polyscias elegans

Celery Wood Polyscias elegans Other names: Silver Basswood
For a rainforest species the Celery Wood is rather fast growing and can reach a height of 30m. It is distinguished by its elegant foliage made up of large, glossy compound leaves forming an umbrella-like shape at the end of branches (Picture 1). Especially the bark, among other parts of the tree, has a celery-like odour when rubbed and is beige to grey in colour. On older trees it becomes deeply furrowed with a very hard and brittle texture in dry periods (2). The fruit (a drupe) turns a very dark purple to nearly black in colour when fully ripe, measures about 5 mm in diameter and is flattened and rounded in shape. Fruit ripens over autumn into winter (3). Large pinnate or sometimes bi-pinnate compound leaves can measure more than 50 cm in length and feature up to 13 leaflets, which are; up to 12 cm long, mostly ovate in shape with entire margins, hairless, dark green, very glossy on top, paler green and also glossy beneath, faintly celery-like scented with a very smooth and polished-like texture. Leaf apex is short acuminate ending in a fine point, base shape broadly cuneate to rounded. Petiolule (leaflet stalk) is up to 10 mm long. Venation is fine but clearly visible on both surfaces (4 & 5). Distribution: From southern NSW to north Qld.

Celery Wood Polyscias elegans
(1)
Celery Wood Polyscias elegans Bark
(2)
Fruit Polyscias elegans
(3)
Celery Wood Polyscias elegans Leaf
(4)
Celery Wood Polyscias elegans Leaflets
(5)
Chain Fruit Alyxia ruscifolia

Chain Fruit Alyxia ruscifolia
This native shrub with a wide distribution range grows to height of 4m and occurs in most types of rainforests (Picture 1). Bark is a mid brown to olive-green in colour with a flaky texture (2). Beautiful white flowers feature 5 fused petals forming a cylindrical floral tube (reddish-brown) which separates into 5 lobes at the top. Flowers are up to 2.5 cm long and less than 1 cm in diameter at the apex. They are held in tight clusters of up to 10 individuals at the very end of branches (3). The unusual fruit is fleshy, roughly globose in shape, bright orange-red in colour and about 10 mm in diameter. It can be single or nearly fully divided into 5 segments (chain-like) giving this native species its common name and contains a hard seed in each segment (4). The simple leaves are held in a whorl arrangement of up to 6 (mostly 4) and contain a white latex. Leaves are; up to 7 cm long, mostly ovate in shape with entire margins, dark green and glossy on top, paler beneath with a stiff and slightly rough texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a very sharp spine, base shape is cuneate. Lateral veins are broad and raised on upper leaf surface (5). Distribution: From NSW south coast to northern Qld.

Chain Fruit Alyxia ruscifolia
(1)
Chain Fruit Alyxia ruscifolia Bark
(2)
Flower Alyxia ruscifolia
(3)
Alyxia ruscifolia Fruit
(4)
Chain Fruit Alyxia ruscifolia Leaves
(5)

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Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi

Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi Other names: Buttonwood
This medium sized tree species with a compact and rounded canopy reaches less than 20m in height. It is common along watercourses, within different types of rainforests and also in tall open forests (Pictures 1 & 2). Bark is coloured a light to medium brown with a rough and fissured texture (3). The fruit varies from light green to red in colour and measures up to 2 cm across (4). Simple leaves with an alternate leaf arrangement (mature trees) are; up to 10 cm long (leaves are considerably larger on saplings), elliptic to oblong in shape with entire margins, hairless, dark green and glossy on top, paler but shiny below with a smooth and soft texture. Apex is short acuminate, base is cuneate and sometimes asymmetric (5). Distribution: From NSW south coast to central Qld. Note: Excellent species for riverbank regeneration work; roots exposed by floods will sprout new growth.

Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi
(1)
Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi 2
(2)
 Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi Bark
(3)
Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi Fruit
(4)
Cheese Tree Glochidion ferdinandi Leaves
(5)
Coachwoood Ceratopetalum apetalum

Coachwoood Ceratopetalum apetalum
The Coachwood is a medium size tree species growing to a height of 30m and is found in different types of rainforests (Pictures 1 & 2). Bark on the distinctive straight trunk is greyish white in colour with a firm texture showing horizontal markings (3). Simple leaves with an opposite leaf arrangement are; between 8 to 15 cm long, elliptic to oblong in shape with finely toothed margins, hairless, firm and leathery in texture. Leaf apex is short acuminate, base shape is cuneate. Mid vein is raised and yellow coloured on lower leaf surface, otherwise venation is faint (4). The petiole has a prominent pulvinus (swelling) at the base and is up to 2 cm long. Horizontal scars left behind by fallen stipules are visible (5). Distribution: from the NSW South coast to central Qld. See Leaf Characteristics Page for more information on definitions used.

Coachwood Ceratopetalum apetalum
(1)
Coachwood Ceratopetalum apetalum 2
(2)
 Coachwood Ceratopetalum apetalum Bark
(3)
Ceratopetalum apetalum
(4)
Coachwood Ceratopetalum apetalum Leaves
(5)
Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia

Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia
The Coast Banksia is able to reach a height of 15m in sheltered positions, whereas in exposed coastal locations it is often a windblown and twisted shrub less than 5m high ( Picture 1). Bark on older specimens is a light grey in colour, deeply fissured and firm in texture (2). Pale to bright yellow flower spikes are up to 10 cm long and bloom over the warmer months of the year (3). Picture 4 shows the dehiscent fruit (after opening) to the left and in its early development after flowering to the right (4). Up to 6 simple leaves form a whorl below the growing bud turning to an alternate arrangement thereafter. They are; up to 18 cm long, mostly oblanceolate in shape with entire (toothed in juveniles) and incurved margins, dark green and hairless on top, light grey to nearly white and finely hairy below, firm and leathery in texture. Leaf apex is rounded, base shape is attenuate. Mid vein is prominent and a yellow colour, numerous straight lateral veins are rather faint (5). Distribution: Common species in Tasmania, Vic., NSW and Qld. See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia
(1)
Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia Bark
(2)
Flower Banksia integrifolia
(3)
Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia
(4)
Coast Banksia Banksia integrifolia Leaves
(5)
Coast Beard Heath Leucopogon parviflorus

Coast Beard Heath Leucopogon parviflorus
The first vegetation behind sand dunes is the habitat of this tall shrub reaching up to 5m in height. It often shares this habitat with the Coastal Tea Tree (Leptospermum laevigatum) (Picture 1). Bark is brown in colour and covered in fine ridges, giving it a finely rough texture (2). The fleshy fruit (a drupe) is globose (rounded in shape) and measures up to 4 mm in length. It changes to a milky white colour at full maturity (3). Branchlets (young branches) are clothed in very fine, whitish hair (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up 3 cm long, oblanceolate (reverse lance-shaped) with entire margins, hairless, rather thick and strong. Leaf apex is rounded with a tiny tip (mucronate), base gradually narrows. Petiole (leaf stalk) is very short or absent. Parallel venation is visible on upper surface with normally 3 veins more pronounced (5). Distribution: Widespread along Australia’s east coast.

Coast Beard Heath Leucopogon parviflorus
(1)
Coast Beard Heath Leucopogon parviflorus Bark
(2)
Fruit Leucopogon parviflorus
(3)
Leucopogon parviflorus
(4)
Coast Beard Heath Leucopogon parviflorus Leaves
(5)
Coast Cypress Pine Callitris columellaris

Coast Cypress Pine Callitris columellaris
As the name suggests this native conifer in the family CUPRESSACEAE occurs on sandy soils in proximity to the coast. Under suitable conditions it grows to 25m tall and has a characteristic dark green and dense canopy supported by an upright trunk, even in areas regularly exposed to high winds. In the field it is impossible to distinguish this species from the White Cypress Pine (C.glaucophylla), except for location as the later species occurs in drier inland areas, and Callitris intratropica in Western Australia. Some botanists classify these different taxa as variations or subspecies only. (Source: http://www.conifers.org/cu/Callitris_columellaris.php) (1). At the base of the trunk bark is charcoal grey to nearly black in colour and has a very rough fissured texture (2). The woody seed cone varies in size from 12 to 25mm in diameter and consists of 6 relative thin and rough cone scales that widely open to release the seed. The brown stiff and non-transparent papery wing(s) enclosing the seed is irregular in shape and up to 5mm long (3 & 4). On mature trees whorls of 3 tiny scale-like leaves appear at short internodes and are only up to 3mm long. They are sharply pointed at the tip and rounded on their backside without are ridge (not keeled). Colour can vary from deep dark green to a bluish grey green (glaucous), probably depending on available moisture (5). Distribution (as subspecies or variations): SA, Vic., NSW, Qld, NT & WA. See also Port Jackson Cypress Pine (C.rhomboidea) Page 8.

Callitris columellaris Coastal Cypress Pine
(1)
Callitris columellaris Coastal Cypress Pine Bark
(2)
Callitris columellaris Cones
(3)
Callitris columellaris Coastal Cypress Pine
(4)
Callitris columellaris Coastal Cypress Pine Leaves
(5)
Coastal Rosemary 'Wynyabbie Gem' Westringia fruticosa x eremicola

Coastal Rosemary Westringia fruticosa x eremicola
As the common name suggest this native shrub bears a resemblance to the culinary herb, but does not contain any aromatic oils. The images show the cultivar 'Wynyabbie' , a hybrid of W.fruticosa (Coastal Rosemary) and W.eremicola (Slender Western Rosemary or Slender Westringia), an inland species. This cultivar is a single-stemmed sturdy shrub able to reach a height of 2m and is widely used as an ornamental plant (Picture 1). Bark is a greyish brown in colour with distinct longitudinal ridges (2). The flower corolla of this cultivar is pale mauve to pink with brownish dots in the centre, whereas W.fruticosa is white and W.eremicola is mauve or purple (3). Leaves of this cultivar typically appear in whorls of 4, as is the case for W.fruticosa. Leaves of W.eremicola are arranged in a whorl of only 3, but are the same length (about 2 cm) and linear to more narrow elliptic in shape, thereby resembling this cultivar (4 & 5). Natural distribution: W.fruticosa; often in close proximity to the coastline in NSW. W.eremicola; in dryer inland areas of SA, Vic., NSW and Qld.

Coastal Rosemary Wynyabbie Gem
(1)
Westringia fruticosa x eremicola Bark
(2)
Westringia fruticosa x eremicola
(3)
Flower Westringia fruticosa x eremicola
(4)
Coastal Rosemary Westringia fruticosa x eremicolae Leaves
(5)

See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of botanical definitions and concepts.

Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum

Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum
The Coastal Tea Tree is a tall native shrub or small tree reaching a height of 6m or more. Its ability to tolerate strong salt spray makes it a common sight in coastal locations. Older specimens are multi trunked and with a spreading habit can form dense stands, which are often the first vegetation behind sand dunes (Picture 1). Bark is rough and stringy in texture shedding in long strips. It is cream coloured when newly exposed changing to a grey-brown with maturity (2). White flowers measure between 15 to 20 mm in diameter and bloom late winter to spring (3). The fruit is a dry woody capsule up to 5mm in diameter seated on a stalk 3 to 4mm long. It splits at the apex to release numerous fine seeds and detaches soon thereafter (4). Small simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 25mm long, mostly oblanceolate in shape with entire margins, hairless, grey-green, rather dull on both surfaces and firm in texture. Apex is rounded with a very small tip (mucronate), leaf base shape is attenuate. Petiole (leaf stalk) is only 1 - 2 mm long and yellow-brown in colour. Venation is faint but 3 longitudinal veins are more obvious (Picture 5). Distribution: Widespread in coastal areas of Tasmania, South Australia, Victoria, NSW and Qld.

Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum
(1)
Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum Bark
(2)
Flower Leptospermum laevigatum
(3)
Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum Fruit
(4)
Coastal Tea Tree Leptospermum laevigatum Leaves
(5)
Common Acronychia Acronychia oblongifolia

Common Acronychia Acronychia oblongifolia
The natural habitats of this wide spread shrub, or small to medium sized tree, include open Eucalypt dominated forests, different types of rainforests and their margins. It also a pioneer species in regrowth after clearing (Picture 1). Bark is finely fissured and light brown in colour (2). The bright white coloured fruit measures up to 15 mm in diameter. It features 4 distinct lobes containing one or two brown seeds each (3). Simple (1-foliate) leaves with an opposite arrangement are; up to 12 cm long, oblong to obovate with entire margins, hairless, very glossy on both sides with a firm smooth texture and give off a pleasant scent when crushed. Leaf apex is rounded or notched, base shape is mostly cuneate (4). Petioles (leaf stalks) can be up to 3 cm long and feature distinct joints (5). Distribution: Vic., NSW to central Qld.

Common Acronychia oblongifolia
(1)
Acronychia oblongifolia Bark
(2)
Fruit Acronychia oblongifolia
(3)
Common Acronychia oblongifolia Leaves
(4)
Common Acronychia oblongifolia Petiole
(5)
Coogera Arytera divaricata

Coogera Arytera divaricata Other names: Rose Tamarind
The brightly pink to salmon coloured new growth is a distinctive characteristic of this rainforest tree species. Within subtropical rainforests it is able to reach more than 20m in height (Picture 1). Bark is a light to mid grey in colour with a firm and finely rough texture (2). The fruit is a capsule with 1 to 3 nearly separated segments (lobes) each containing a brown coloured seed, which is partly covered by a red fleshy aril (turning black when exposed) (3). Pinnate compound leaves consist of up to seven leaflets, four are most common (4). Leaflets are; up to 14 cm long, elliptic to obovate in shape with entire margins, dark green, glossy when mature, vivid pink when emerging, strong and rather rough in texture. Venation is clearly visible on both leaflet surfaces, small hollow domatia are present along the centre vein (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to north Qld.

Coogera Arytera divaricata
(1)
Coogera Arytera divaricata Bark
(2)
Fruit Arytera divaricata
(3)
Coogera Arytera divaricata Leaves
(4)
Coogera Arytera divaricata
(5)
Corkwood Duboisia myoporoides

Corkwood Duboisia myoporoides Other names: Duboisia
The Corkwood or Duboisia grows on the margins or within different types of rainforests and reaches a height of up to 20m (Picture 1). Crooked trunks feature a very deeply furrowed and corky bark, which is light brown in colour with grey and cream coloured patches. Bark texture is more brittle than that of the Soft Corkwood Ackama paniculata (2). Small white flowers with five rounded and frilled petals are less than 1 cm in diameter and are arranged on large panicles, which appear at the very end of young branches. Main flowering period is late winter and spring (3). The rounded to slightly ovoid shaped fruit is a berry turning black when fully mature. It measures 5 to 6 mm across with the remaining (flower) calyx visible at the base of the fruit (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 13 cm long, elliptic to oblanceolate in shape with wavy margins, greyish dull green, hairless and soft in texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a fairly blunt point, base shape is attenuate. Venation is only faintly visible but the centre vein is prominently raised (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to central Qld.

Coogera Arytera divaricata
(1)
Coogera Arytera divaricata Bark
(2)
Fruit Arytera divaricata
(3)
Coogera Arytera divaricata Leaves
(4)
Coogera Arytera divaricata
(5)
Crabapple Schizomeria ovata

Crabapple Schizomeria ovata Other names: White Birch
This species is normally a medium sized tree up to 25 m high occurring within subtropical rainforests and other forest types, but more exceptional specimens can attain a height of up to 40m (Picture 1). Bark is very firm and fissured on the lower trunk of older specimens and shades of grey in colour (2). The globose (globe-shaped) fruit (a drupe) is white to pale yellow coloured and measures up to 2 cm in diameter. The white fruit flesh emits an apple like scent when crushed and contains a single seed enclosed in a hard shell (3). Simple leaves with an opposite arrangement are; up to 16 cm long, oblong to ovate in shape, hairless, glossy and feature leaf margins which are very varied from finely toothed to nearly entire. Petiole is up to 3 cm long with a pronounced joint at the stem (4). Stipules enclosing the growth bud are up to 5mm long and leave a horizontal scar on the young branch. Mid vein is prominently raised and a yellowish colour on lower leaf surface, curved lateral veins are clearly visible (5). Distribution: From the NSW south-coast to southern Qld.

Crabapple Schizomeria ovata
(1)
Crabapple Schizomeria ovata Bark
(2)
Fruit Schizomeria ovata
(3)
Crabapple Schizomeria ovata Leaves
(4)
Crabapple Schizomeria ovata Stipule scar
(5)
Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus

Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus
This handsome native shrub with a wide distribution range is a common occurrence near the coastline and in low lying areas, where it prefers moist locations. It can reach up to 4m in height, often with a straggling growth habit, using other vegetation for support where possible (Photo 1). Bark on mature specimens is rough, flaky and especially around the base rather soft in texture. Colour is a mid-brown (2). Crimson flower spikes have a bottlebrush like appearance and measure up to 15 cm in length. Individual flowers are dominated by numerous filaments topped by small black anthers and bloom over a long period from spring into autumn (3). The cup-shaped fruit measures up to 6 mm in diameter, turns woody when fully mature and is stalk-less. Valves at the top of the capsule open to release a great amount of very fine, brown coloured seeds, which are light enough for aerial dispersion. Old capsules that will not detach, but remain on branches for years, are a good identification feature (4). Mature simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 8 cm long, oblanceolate in shape with entire margins, same colour green on both surfaces (concolorous), hairless, lemon-scented when crushed, strong and rigid in texture. Leaf apex is acute, base gradually narrows into the petiole, which is a yellowish colour and only 2 to 3 mm long. Midrib is yellowish on the underside, oil glands are clearly visible and an intramarginal vein is present (5). Distribution: Vic., NSW and Qld.

Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus
(1)
Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus Bark
(2)
Callistemon citrinus Flower
(3)
Fruit Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus
(4)
Crimson Bottlebrush Callistemon citrinus Leaves
(5)

See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of botanical definitions and concepts.

Currant Tree Antidesma bunius

Currant Tree Antidesma bunius Other names:
This species has a wide distribution range throughout Asia and occurs naturally in drier tropical rainforests of north-eastern Queensland. Depending on conditions and location it can be a tall densely foliated shrub or a tree up to 25m tall (Picture 1). Bark on the trunk is rough, flaky and fissured; it weathers from a pink under-layer of fresh bark to dark brown then grey before shedding in irregular patches (2). The fleshy fruit, a drupe packed into elongated bunches (former flower racemes), is up to 20mm long and roughly ovoid in shape. It changes from red to black when fully ripe and contains a hard-shelled light brown seed. The sour but edible fruit is used to produce jams and wine (Pictures 3 & 4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 15 cm long, broadly elliptic or more obovate with entire margins, dark green, hairless on top, paler green beneath and leathery in texture. Domatia in the shape of bristles are visible along the centre vein on the lower leaf surface. The short petiole and young stems are covered in fine brown hair. Distribution: North-eastern Qld.

Currant Tree Antidesma bunius
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Currant Tree Antidesma bunius Bark
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Currant Tree Antidesma bunius Fruit
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Fruit Antidesma bunius
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Currant Tree Antidesma bunius Leaves
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Cut-leaved Mint Bush Prostanthera incisa

Cut-leaved Mint Bush Prostanthera incisa
When in full flower over spring this normally inconspicuous shrub becomes very noticeable. It prefers sheltered positions on the margins of rainforests or in wet tall forests (wet sclerophyll forests) at higher altitudes. Under favourable conditions it may reach 3m in height with a spread of 2m or more (Picture 1). Bark is brown in colour with a firm and finely rough texture, due to fine ridges and blisters covering the surface (2). Masses of violet flowers measure up to 1cm in diameter when fully opened. They feature a distinctive two-lipped (2 lobed) calyx (flower base) and a corolla that is divided into 5 rounded lobes at the apex, attributes that are characteristic for this large genus (3 & 4). Simple leaves with an opposite arrangement are; up to 4 cm long, lanceolate (lance-shaped) or more ovate with irregular toothed margins (up to 4 teeth on each side), hairless, dark green on top, pale green beneath, soft in texture and emit a very strong mint/menthol like scent when crushed. A dense cover of surface glands is visible without a lens (5). Distribution: Vic., NSW, & Qld. Note: This species is used in cultivation and produces an essential oil.

Cut-leaved Mint Bush Prostanthera incisa
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Cut-leaved Mint Bush Prostanthera incisa Bark
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Flower Prostanthera incisa
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Cut-leaved Mint Bush Flower Prostanthera incisa
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Cut-leaved Mint Bush Prostanthera incisa Leaves
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Cuttsia Cuttsia viburnea

Cuttsia Cuttsia viburnea Other names: Native Elderberry
The Cuttsia is a small understorey tree growing to a height of 15m within or on margins of subtropical and warm temperate rainforests (Picture 1). The pale grey bark on older specimens is soft and corky in texture with blisters and ridges being present ( 2). Attractive white flowers with a yellow centre are very pleasantly honey scented. They are borne on tightly packed panicles and bloom over spring (3). Abundant fruit in the shape of small rounded capsules is produced over summer. Fruit measures up to 5 mm in diameter and is green to light brown in colour (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 20 cm long, broad elliptic to obovate in shape with finely toothed margins, bright green and glossy on top, pale green beneath, hairless, thin and very soft in texture. Apex is acute to short acuminate, base shape is cuneate. Petiole (leaf stalk)is up to 20 mm long. Mid vein and prominent curved laterals are sunken on upper leaf surface and strongly raised below 5). Distribution: Mid-north coast of NSW to southern Qld.

Cuttsia viburnea Native Elderberry
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Cuttsia viburnea Native Elderberry Bark
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Flower Cuttsia viburnea
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Cuttsia viburnea Native Elderberry Fruit
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Cuttsia viburnea Native Elderberry Leaves
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Davidson's Plum Davidsonia jerseyana

Davidson's Plum NSW Davidsonia jerseyana
This small native tree species is often used in cultivation for its edible fruit but is very uncommon in its natural habitat of subtropical rainforests. Mature specimens have a straight slender trunk which is only sparsely branched and can attain a height of 12m (Picture 1). Bark is brown in colour showing warty blisters and small ridges, texture overall is firm (2). Red flowers appear on the trunk of the tree and bloom from late winter into spring (3). Striking red coloured new growth is covered in prickly stiff hair which can cause irritation to the skin when touched (4). Large pinnate compound leaves can be more than 80 cm long and feature 15 (sometimes more) leaflets, which are; up to 30 cm long, oblong or slightly oblanceolate in shape with toothed margins, mid green, white hairy on top, covered in stiff brownish hair beneath (especially on veins) and firm in texture. Apex is short acuminate and base shape is rounded. Mid vein and laterals are raised and covered in prickly beige to brown coloured hair on the leaf's underside (5). Distribution: Confined to few valleys in the Northern Rivers area of NSW. Identification: Very similar to Davidsonia pruriens but this species differs in bark texture and being prickly hairy. See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Davidson's Plum NSW Davidsonia jerseyana
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Davidson's Plum NSW Davidsonia jerseyana Bark
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Flower Davidsonia jerseyana
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Davidson's Plum NSW Davidsonia jerseyana
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Davidson's Plum NSW Davidsonia jerseyana Leaflet
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Davidson's Plum Qld Davidsonia pruriens

Davidson's Plum Qld Davidsonia pruriens
Originating in tropical rainforests this tree species with a slender and upright trunk reaches a height of 15m (Image 1). Bark is brown in colour with a scaly and flaky texture (2). Vivid blue fruits reassembling a plum are up to 6 cm long and embedded in the dark red fruit flesh contain one or two flat and rounded seeds (3). Large pinnate compound leaves with an opposite arrangement are more than 100 cm long. They consist of up to 17 leaflets which increase in size from the base upwards. They are; up to 20 cm long, oblong to oblanceolate in shape with regularly toothed margins and feature leafy stipules at the base of the petiole. Venation is prominent with centre and lateral veins being raised on lower leaflet surface and covered in soft whitish hair (4 & 5). Distribution: Northern Qld. Note: This species and the former one were classified as subspecies in the past.

Davidson's Plum Davidsonia pruriens
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Davidson's Plum Davidsonia pruriens Bark
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Davidsonia pruriens Fruit
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Davidson's Plum Davidsonia pruriens Qld
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Davidson's Plum Davidsonia pruriens Leaflet
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Denhamia Denhamia celastroides

Denhamia Denhamia celastroides
The Denhamia is a small native species reaching a height of less than 10m and occurs as an understorey tree in different types of rainforests, transition zones and adjacent open forests (Picture 1). Bark on often multi-trunked specimens is firm, finely rough and beige to light grey in colour (2). Small green and white flowers measure 3 to 4 mm in diameter and bloom in early spring (3). The small fruit (a capsule) is globular in shape, up to 12mm in diameter and turns greenish yellow in colour when fully ripe (4). Simple leaves emerge in a whorl and then turn to an alternate arrangement with maturity. They are; up to 12cm long, elliptic in shape with fine but often irregular toothed margins, dark green and glossy on top, lighter and quite glossy below with a firm, thick and rather stiff texture. Leaf apex is acute, base shape is cuneate. The petiole (leaf stalk) is between 3 to 6mm long. Venation is prominent and raised on both leaf surfaces (5). Distribution: NSW mid-north coast to southern Qld.

Denhamia celastroides
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Denhamia celastroides Bark
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Denhamia celastroides Flower
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Denhamia celastroides Fruit
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Denhamia celastroides Leaves
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Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum

Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum
This small native shrub reaches less than 2m in height and occurs in different types of rainforests and in more open Eucalypt dominated forests (Picture 1). Young and older stems are finely hairy and feature widely spaced needle like spines up to 15mm long (2). The small globular shaped fruit is up to 8 mm in diameter and turns a reddish colour when mature. It is partly covered by hairy sepals (3). Alternately arranged simple leaves are; up to 10 cm long, lanceolate in shape with mostly entire margins, mid green, dull and more or less hairless on top, pale yellow beneath due to a dense cover of fine hair. Apex is acute or sometimes more long acuminate, base shape is rounded and often oblique (irregular sides). Petiole, which can feature spines, is hairy and up to 15 mm long. Mid vein and laterals are raised on lower surface and are finely yellowish hairy (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to central Qld.

Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum
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Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum Stem
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Fruit Solanum stelligerum
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Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum Foliage
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Devil's Needle Solanum stelligerum Leaves
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Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora

Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora
The Dorrigo Maple (smaller tree in foreground) is a medium sized tree reaching 25m in height and prefers cooler rainforests in mountainous terrain (Picture 1). Bark is a whitish grey in colour and normally rather smooth and soft in texture. It is often obscured by lichen and mosses and shows some damage in the picture (2). Interesting flowers are borne on short racemes and are up to 5mm wide at the top and the same in length. This flower is regarded as a perianth (no petals) where the fleshy calyx tube shows 5 rounded lobes at the top, which are a vivid pink to purplish red colour (3). Growth buds and young stems are covered in fine rusty brown hair. Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 11 cm long, mostly elliptic to slightly ovate or obovate in shape with entire margins, wrinkled, hairless, semi-glossy and mid green on top, blotchy white-grey beneath with a firm texture (4). Veins which are finely hairy on the lower leaf surface and domatia as elongated pockets visible along the mid vein make good identification features (5). Distribution: NSW mid-north coast to southern Qld. See Flower Identification and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora
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Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora Bark
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Endiandra crassiflora Flower
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Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora Leaves
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Dorrigo Maple Endiandra crassiflora Domatia
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Doughwood Acronychia octandra

Doughwood Acronychia octandra
The Doughwood is a medium sized tree species found in subtropical rainforests. The common name refers to the smell of its fresh-cut timber (Photo 1). Bark is firm, mostly smooth in texture and a light grey colour (2). Leaf arrangement is mainly opposite (3). Large compound leaves feature 3 leaflets up to 18 cm long, narrow obovate in shape with entire margins and a rounded or sometimes slightly notched leaf tip. Leaves are smooth (not hairy) with a firm and leathery texture, giving off a scent when crushed (4 & 5). Distribution: From NSW mid-north coast to central Qld.
See also Hairy Doughwood (White Euodia Page 7) Melicope micrococca and Pink Doughwood (Pink Euodia Page 5) Melicope elleryana.

Doughwood Acronychia octandra
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Doughwood Acronychia octandra Bark
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Doughwood Acronychia octandra Foliage
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Doughwood Acronychia octandra Leaf lower surface
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Doughwood Acronychia octandra Leaf
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Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii

Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii Other names: Little Kurrajong, Rusty Kurrajong
The Dwarf or Little Kurrajong is a native shrub less than 5m high, which is restricted to a relative small distribution range. It is related to the well known Flame Tree Brachychiton acerifolius Page 5 (Picture 1). Bark on this specimen is grey in colour with a firm and rather smooth texture; older stems can show small fissures and blisters (2). Beautiful vibrant red flowers measure up to 5 cm in diameter and are covered in very fine soft hair. They are held in tight groups of up to 8 individual flowers appearing from late winter (3). The fruit is a brownish follicle 10 to 12 cm long. It is covered in woolly hair (which may irritate skin) and will split on one side only to reveal about 20 yellowish seeds (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; deciduous, varied in size at between 5 to 20 cm long (mature), wide and ovate in shape with 3 or sometime 5 large lobes, dark green and sparsely hairy on top, woolly hairy beneath (rusty brown in colour, especially along veins) and soft in texture. Leaf apex is acute, base shape is cordate. The strong and also hairy petiole is 15 cm in long. Palmate venation is clearly visible (5). Distribution: Drier often rocky areas in south Qld.

Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii
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Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii Bark
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Flower Brachychiton bidwillii
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Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii Fruit
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Dwarf Kurrajong Brachychiton bidwillii Leaf
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Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia

Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia
This native shrub is able to propagate from underground rootstock, giving it some protection from bush fires. It is mostly found less than 4m tall but can sometimes develop into a small tree. Elderberry Panax occurs in a range of different forest types including dryer, tall eucalypt forests and in regrowth areas (Picture 1). Bark is firm in texture, a greyish green in colour and covered in corky small bumps (lenticels) (2). Small flowers only measure up to 3mm across and feature 5 stamens with prominent anthers. Flowers are held on long spread-out panicles which end in an umbel arrangement of up to 12 individual flowers (3). The fruit is a fleshy drupe, rounded, flattened in shape and up to 5 mm long. It contains a single brown seed with a hard outer layer (4). The pinnate compound leaf features 5 to more than 10 separate leaflets, which are; varied in length from 4 to 15 cm, mostly lanceolate in shape with irregular toothed margins, smooth, hairless, dark green above, light grey/green beneath. Apex is long acuminate, base shape is cuneate. Leaf like stipules are often present at the base of the compound leaf. Venation is more visible on the upper leaflet surface (5). Distribution: Wide-spread from Vic, NSW to southern Qld.

Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia
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Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia Bark
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Flower Polyscias sambucifolia
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Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia Fruit
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Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia Leaf
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